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Monday, July 27, 2020 | History

3 edition of Hooking mortality of walleye caught from deep water found in the catalog.

Hooking mortality of walleye caught from deep water

Sally L. Bruesewitz

Hooking mortality of walleye caught from deep water

by Sally L. Bruesewitz

  • 345 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by Inland Fish Division Research, Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife in Olympia, Wash .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Walleye (Fish) -- Washington (State) -- Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake -- Mortality,
  • Fishes -- Protection -- Washington (State) -- Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake,
  • Walleye fishing -- Washington (State) -- Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake,
  • Fishhooks -- Environmental aspects -- Washington (State)

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Sally Bruesewitz, Doug Fletcher and Marc Divens.
    SeriesResearch report -- no. IF96-07, Research report (Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife) -- no. IF96-07.
    ContributionsFletcher, Douglas H., Divens, Marc, 1964-, Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife. Inland Fish Division Research.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationiii, 7, [1] p. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13594824M
    OCLC/WorldCa35958310

    Steps to Reduce Striped Bass Hooking Mortality From Fish Caught. in Deep Water. Fish as shallow as possible: If fish are in 60 feet water try catching them at 30 feet rather than at a depth of 50 feet, this helps reduce the bends. When bait fishing, use circle-type hooks, designed for hooking fish in.   MIN has done a number of studies on hooking mortality on Walleyes. The results say the depth a walleye is caught from is highly influential in their survival rates after release. Smallmouth bass generally do not live as deep as Walleyes can and do throughout the year, so it is less of a factor in their survival after release.

      Walleye Nation Death Jig. New in and improved for , the Death Jig features the company's "Double Trouble" configuration of a No. 8 Matzuo treble hook, 2/0 Matzuo slow-death hook and heavy-duty swivel. Comes with a propeller, which can be removed for slow-trolling and stealth applications. Drift or troll with live bait.   Cold water helps some, but delayed mortality will kill most of the fish taken in waters deeper than that, often hours later. I have no problem with harvest, I certainly do my share, but any fish that I catch out of deep water, like 35' +, is going home with me.

      Making the hook. Slow death is unlike the many walleye techniques in which you meticulously feed line to fussy fish and wait. Just ask the pros. According to Gary Parsons, practically anyone can catch walleye with slow death—you simply drag the rig behind your boat and hold on. And when you feel a fish, set the hook. Fishing a Lake Erie Weapon. The fun of fishing a Lake Erie walleye fishing weapon is that instead of carrying expensive lures in different weights and colors to cover the bases, one weapon can do it all. A weapon is a 16 to inch piece of monofilament with a snelled octopus hook on the end with 4 to five beads and a clevis to hold your blade.


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Hooking mortality of walleye caught from deep water by Sally L. Bruesewitz Download PDF EPUB FB2

Walleyes caught in 30 feet of water had about an 8 percent chance of perishing–fish from 40 feet 18 percent mortality, and fish from 50 feet 35 percent mortality. For each additional 10 feet of depth, mortality roughly doubled. Experimental handling time was an additional factor, with linger handling increasing the likelihood of mortality.

Hooking mortality of walleye caught from deep water (Research report) [Sally L Bruesewitz] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Sally L Bruesewitz. Hooking mortality of walleye caught from deep water. Olympia, Wash.: Inland Fish Division Research, Washington Dept.

of Fish and Wildlife, [] (OCoLC) Mortality of angler-caught Walleyes increases with water temperature, but of potentially greater significance is the consistent finding that the probability of mortality increases sharply as water.

The warmer the water, the more fish die from hooking mortality, especially when water temps get above 70 degrees. Small fish and large fish die. For example, hooking mortality of walleyes caught by recreational anglers ranged from 0% to % on Mille Lacs, Minnesota (Reeves and Bruesewitz ).

If effort is high and post-release. As water temps begin to drop in the Fall, Walleye sense the urge to bulk up for Winter. As Summer vegetation erodes, Baitfish are pushed deep into the Walleye territory right when they become aggressive.

Walleye are covering a lot of water in the Fall, and school tightly to large packs. If you want to release fish that are caught in water over about 30 feet or so, use a deep water release and you will be fine.

Rig up a release rod with a deep water release on it. When you catch a fish that nees to be releasd, hook it to the deep water release rod, drop the weighted fish back to the bottom, jerk the release and let it go. Mortality was highest in warmer water, said Tom Heinrich, Mille Lacs Area Fisheries Supervisor for the DNR.

“Water and air temperature are really big factors. Fish don’t seem as able to survive the rigors of being caught and being in warm water,’’ Heinrcih said. “So the key is, keep it (playing the fish) short. Yes fish will die. Very high mortality rates for walleye caught in deep water.

Best to fish in less than 30' of water and 25 or less is even better. Estimates of hooking mortality in nontournament fishing of walleye Sander vitreus in North America range between 0% and 19%, based on studies in which walleyes were caught by angling and then.

The mortality of walleyes caught and released by anglers in Klawitter's Pond was 5%, though confidence intervals indicated that hooking mortality could have been as high as 23%. The common walleye trolling setup for rods is to spread them out around the boat (see the diagrams). Basically, you’re using the longest trolling rods you have out the sides and the shorter rods back at an angle.

I use foot walleye rods out the sides, and 5-foot “shorty” rods out of the inside when long lining all 4 rods. The study compared the hooking mortality caused by crankbaits and leeches, two popular walleye rigs.

None of the walleye caught on crankbaits later died. The hooking mortality for leeches was about 10 percent - significant, but still low enough that anglers could release fish with fair confidence that they would survive. In deep water, walleyes may suspend, roam the basin or relate to the bases of structure at or slightly above the summer thermocline.

The deeper the fish, the more active they’ll be during the day. So if your fishing time is confined to daylight hours, it’s best to concentrate on deep-water structures.

Deep Water Walleye Tips & Techniques When you catch a big Walleye, big meaning over 6-pounds, there is a 95% chance that it's a female. The big females generally only come shallow in the spring when they are up along the shore, in rivers or over sandbars, which are their favorite places to spawn.

Hooking mortality was most associated with water temperature, bleeding, fish length, hook location, and fish floating upon release. Mortality increased as the water warmed above 18°C and was higher for fish that bled at temperatures less than 24°C but similar for both bleeding and nonbleeding fishes at temperatures of 24°C or more.

Hooking method, or how deeply into its mouth a walleye eats the bait is a big influencer, as is the use of live bait vs. artificials, but those are often related.

Water temperature is another factor, and warmer temps see fish that simply don’t release as well and survive. We found some baitfish in deep water, in fact I will never forget watching the depth-finder, jigging a Rattle Snakie in 51 feet of water, when I hooked a really nice fish–ended up being a inch walleye.

I was concerned about that fish because I wanted to release her, but had caught her from such deep water. Use an electric trolling motor keeping a degree angle between line and water's surface. Using a lighter bottom bouncer of 1 ounce, even in 70 feet of water, will force you to go slow.

Whenever you feel the chub signal that it sees a walleye, stop the boat and let the bait do its work. "Walleyes will smash it," Parsons said.

Double your fun. If not, use pliers to grab the hook and pull it up and out. Cut the fishing line afterward. What percent of fish die after catch and release?

About 33% of fish who are hooked and returned to the water will die. This constitutes about 1/3 of all catch and release fish.

Fish who are caught from deep water have an even higher mortality rate.In the Minnesota DNR published, Hooking Mortality of Walleye Caught from the Deep Waters of Rainy Lake. I obtained the report and spoke to its author. In essence, data were collected to evaluate the relationship between the rate of mortality and depth of capture, fish length, water temperature, and experimental handling time.Hooking Mortality of Walleye Caught on Live and Artificial Baits, July Author: Payer, Ronald D.;Pereira, Donald L.

Keywords: Hooking Mortality of Walleye Caught on Live and Artificial Baits Created Date: 1/2/ PM.